Is Dog Love, True Love?

From a human point of view is it possible to say that dogs truly love their masters? The simple answer to this question is "no". But suffice it to say that the concept of love is a very large and often times ambiguous one. What is "love" how is it defined, measured, given or received?
While we talk of Mother Nature and the harmony of life can we really say that there exists a bond of "love" between a dog and its master?
If you look in the dictionary for the definition of the word "love" you will find that it says; "a strong feeling (of caring) about someone, a passionate dedication, exclusive and instinctive desire to assure the happiness and well being of someone or something…" Isn't this how you could describe what dogs feel towards their masters?
But why do dogs love their master so? The most obvious and logical answers is that as we previously mentioned, dogs as descendants of the wolf are by their very nature pack animals. And as such give their love, devotion andloyalty to the members of the pack and most of all to the leader of the pack.
Not only this but over the centuries of cohabitation with humans, domestic dogs have adapted to and become an integral part of our world.

Dog kisses: A lot of dog owners get annoyed when their dog licks them on the face or when a dog jumps on them when they get back home from work. If you have this problem, you can train your dog to not do this, especially if it happens to people or guests that come into your house. However, keep in mind that training a dog to not "kiss" you or jump on you takes away from the dog's natural instincts. In a pack of wolves, often times the under wolves approach the dominant one by wagging their tails euphorically and they put their bodies in a downward position. They touch the nose of the dominant dog and lick it, the same way puppies lick their mother so that she can regurgitate her food and feed them. These gestures of affection are a way of considering the owner just the same way it naturally would with the dominant dog. Dogs "kiss" and jump on you because they want to show you their affection, independence, and recognition since to the dog you are the dominant one.

seeFIDODog Behavior and PsychologyDog Social LifeDog CommunicationDog Body Language Part 1More Dog Body LanguageHow Dogs Communicate By SmellsDog Scent MessagesDog InstinctsDogs and PeopleDog Instinct versus ConscienceIs Dog Love, True Love?Dogs and Children